I'm a political moderate, but that might not mean to me what it means to you.
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When a city decides your business is toxic to their community, buy off the state legislature to overrule them.

jwz
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Uber, Lyft returning to Austin

Uber and Lyft will relaunch services in Austin on Monday, now that Texas lawmakers have passed a bill overriding local regulations on ride-hailing companies. [...]

Uber and Lyft left Austin after the Austin City Council passed an ordinance in December 2015 requiring ride-hailing companies to perform fingerprint background checks on drivers, a stipulation that already applies to Austin taxi companies.

Uber and Lyft fiercely opposed the rules, gathering petition signatures to force a public vote and spending nearly $9 million on an unsuccessful campaign asking voters to overturn the regulations. Following the vote, both companies halted services in Austin, and the resulting ride-hailing vacuum attracted several start-up ride-hailing apps that agreed to comply with the city's rules. [...]

Following the passage of the bill in both chambers, Austin Mayor Steve Adler issued a statement saying he was "disappointed" the Legislature voted to nullify regulations the city had implemented.

"Our city should be proud of how we filled the gap created when Uber and Lyft left, and we now must hope that they return ready to compete in a way that reflects Austin's values," Adler wrote.

Previously, previously, previously.

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smadin
1 day ago
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today in #fuckuber (#fucklyft too)
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"There's way worse videos"

jwz
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Today's students on Rodney King:

I mentioned Rodney King in an Intro to American Government class. I got the blank "Is that a thing we are supposed to know?" look that I have come to recognize when students hear about something that happened more than six months ago. "Rodney King?" More blinking. "Can someone tell why the name Rodney King is important?"

One student, god bless her, raised her hand. I paraphrase: "He was killed by the police and it caused the LA Riots." I noted that, no, he did not die, but the second part of the statement was indirectly true. God bless technology in the classroom -- I pulled up the grainy VHS-camcorder version of the video, as well as a transcript of the audio analysis presented at trial. We watched, and then talked a bit about the rioting following the acquittal of the LAPD officers at trial. They kept doing the blinking thing. I struggled to figure out what part of this relatively straightforward explanation had managed to confuse them.

"Are there questions? You guys look confused."

Hand. "So he was OK?"

"He was beaten up pretty badly, but, ultimately he was. He died a few years ago from unrelated causes (note: in 2012)."

Hand. "It's kind of weird that everybody rioted over that. I mean, there's way worse videos." General murmurs of agreement. [...]

This is a generation of kids so numb to seeing videos of police beating, tasering, shooting, and otherwise applying the power of the state to unarmed and almost inevitably black or Hispanic men that they legitimately could not understand why a video of cops beating up a black guy (who didn't even die for pete's sake!) was shocking enough to cause a widespread breakdown of public order. [...]

These kids have grown up in a world where this is background noise. It is part of the static of life in the United States. Whether these incidents outrage them or are met with the usual excuses (Comply faster, dress differently, be less Scary) the fact is that they happen so regularly that retaining even one of them in long term memory is unlikely. To think about Rodney King is to imagine a reality in which it was actually kind of shocking to see a video of four cops kicking and night-sticking an unarmed black man over the head repeatedly. Now videos of police violence are about as surprising and rare as weather reports, and forgotten almost as quickly once passed.

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smadin
17 days ago
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…hooboy.
Boston
popular
18 days ago
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3 public comments
chrishiestand
17 days ago
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My favorite thing about teenagers is the way they hold up a mirror and make you look at yourself
San Diego, CA, USA
rclatterbuck
17 days ago
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The unconscionable was always commonplace, it is just more visible now. As a society we are learning anew that just because we are aware of a problem, doesn't mean it is going to be fixed.
sirshannon
18 days ago
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hell in a hand basket

This Is the Most Unusual Maillot You Will Ever See #WearableWednesday #wearabletech #art

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As a fan of the French language, I am not only enchanted by the title of this wearable, but also its art. Maille Eau by artist Geneviève Favre Petroff is a twist on maillot, translating to “water mesh” which is a wonderful description of this piece. The woven aquarium style tubing allows water to circulate around the outside of a body, much like the cooling liners for NASA spacesuits. Here’s the artist’s description of the work:

This swimsuit is made of transparent woven and assembled pipes. Water circulates through it at different rhythms. It is like a living organism, particles inhabit its nets. This animated sculpture puts us face to our own tingling, our gurgling and variable body flows. It deals with innovations in the field of textiles, in connection with water and biology. Its shape refers both to science fiction and to the seaside fashion of the 1930s.

Maille Eau

Although this piece is an installation, Geneviève is often known for combining performance with tech. Be sure to check out her other work including LED and El Wire pieces. Are you interested in bringing electronics into wearable art? Kate Hartman’s book Make: Wearable Electronics will get you pumped with ideas for interactive projects. Make electronics part of your palette.

Make Wearable Electronics


Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

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smadin
25 days ago
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Hey look, it's that getup from that Robyn video
Boston
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Does less policing lead to more crime? A natural experiment says no

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Originally posted at Montclair Socioblog.

Does crime go up when cops, turtle-like, withdraw into their patrol cars, when they abandon “proactive policing” and respond only when called?

In New York we had the opportunity to test this with a natural experiment. Angry at the mayor, the NYPD drastically cut back on proactive policing starting in early December of 2014. The slowdown lasted through early January. This change in policing – less proactive, more reactive – gave researchers Christopher Sullivan and Zachary O’Keeffe an opportunity to look for an effect. (Fair warning: I do not know if their work has been published yet in any peer-reviewed journal.)

First, they confirmed that cops had indeed cut back on enforcing minor offenses. In the graphs below, the yellow shows the rate of enforcement in the previous year (July 2013 to July 2014) when New York cops were not quite so angry at the mayor. The orange line shows the next year. The cutback in enforcement is clear. The orange line dips drastically; the police really did stop making arrests for quality-of-life offenses.

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Note also that even after the big dip, enforcement levels for the rest of the year remained below those of the previous year, especially in non-White neighborhoods.Sullivan and O’Keeffe also looked at reported crime to see if the decreased enforcement had emboldened the bad guys. The dark blue line shows rates for the year that included the police cutback; the light blue line shows the previous year.

 .

No effect. The crime rates in those winter weeks of reduced policing and after look very much like the crime rates of the year before.

It may be that a few weeks is not enough time for a change in policing to effect serious crime. Certainly, proponents of proactive policing would argue that what attracts predatory criminals to an area is not a low number of arrests but rather the overall sense that this is a place were bad behavior goes unrestrained. Changing the overall character of a neighborhood – for better or worse – takes more than a few weeks.

I have the impression that many people, when they think about crime, use a sort of cops-and-robbers model: cops prevent crime and catch criminals; the more active the cops, the less active the criminals. There may be some truth in that model but, if nothing else, the New York data shows that the connection between policing and crime is not so immediate or direct.

Jay Livingston is the chair of the Sociology Department at Montclair State University. You can follow him at Montclair SocioBlog or on Twitter.

(View original at https://thesocietypages.org/socimages)

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smadin
46 days ago
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surprising no one, fewer cops doesn't lead to more crime.
Boston
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yesterdaysprint: Boston Post, Massachusetts, March 7, 1921...

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yesterdaysprint:

Boston Post, Massachusetts, March 7, 1921

it appears that advertising, as a craft, peaked a long time ago, specifically on 7 March 1921

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smadin
67 days ago
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Listen, I keep trying to tell people Boston is the best place.
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KetchupSteak

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Mostly it isn't that he likes well done steak with ketchup. Eat steak cooked any way you want! Also I think there's generally a US bias against putting any kind of sauce on a steak, which is stupid. A nice perfectly cooked steak without much on it is great, but there's nothing wrong with adding something to that, even ketchup if you like.

It's that if you're going to eat a hockey puck with Heinz, you don't need to pay $50 to do it. If you're paying $50 for a hockey puck with Heinz, you just think that if something costs more it must be better. That $8.99 steak and eggs at the local diner is probably going to be better. And, ok, fine, the Donald is super rich so who cares, but he actually isn't super rich, he's a grifter who lives an ostentatious life by floating from one line of credit to the next.

A $500 bottle of wine might be awesome, but if you can't tell the difference between that and two buck chuck, drink the two buck chuck. There's no shame in that.

I wrote "mostly," and there is one other issue, which is that for all of his supposed "riches," the Donald is a man who seems to have not gone beyond fancy steak houses and golf courses (and gold plated homes) in his appreciation for "the finer things." You can be an obscenely rich guy and love hockey pucks with Heinz, but if the breadth if your experience hasn't gotten beyond that more generally... that's sad!

The well done steak is a symbol.
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smadin
67 days ago
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What Atrios Said (as usual)
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